An analysis of the thoreaus concept of nature in where i lived and what i lived for

He writes of fishing on the pond by moonlight, his mind wandering into philosophical and universal realms, and of feeling the jerk of a fish on his line, which links him again to the reality of nature.

Please keep in mind that other interpretations are possible, including other interpretations that I would make, if I had room for unlimited comments. He focuses on the search itself and the compelling need to make it.

He observes that nobody has previously built on the spot he now occupies — that is, he does not labor under the burden of the past. He writes in "Economy": Throughout the chapter, he writes of subduing the appetites, of subordinating the animal to the higher instincts.

His objective was really to live simply and think and write; in addition, he proved to himself that the necessities of food, clothing, shelter, and fuel could be obtained rather simply for a man who desired only what he needed. Diving into the depths of the pond, the loon suggests the seeker of spiritual truth.

Walden also expressed a critique of consumerism and capitalism that was congenial to the hippies and others who preferred to drop out of the bustle of consumer society and pursue what they saw as greater and more personally meaningful aims.

Thoreau writes in "The Ponds": Thoreau considers man's dual nature — animal and spiritual — in "Higher Laws. I say, let your affairs be as two or three, and not a hundred or a thousand; instead of a million count half a dozen, and keep your accounts on your thumb nail.

Our proper business is to seek the reality — the absolute — beyond what we think we know. Thoreau, recognizing this, fills Walden with sarcasm, pardoxes, and double entendres double meanings.

“Where I Lived, and What I Lived For” by Henry David Thoreau

Such synthesis as is possible between the reality and symbolism of nature takes place within the mind of the observer, through flashes of intuition, inspiration, and imagination. Discussing philanthropy and reform, Thoreau highlights the importance of individual self-realization.

“Where I Lived, and What I Lived For” by Henry David Thoreau

There is intimacy in his connection with nature, which provides sufficient companionship and precludes the possibility of loneliness. It transcends time and change. This higher truth may be sought in the here and now — in the world we inhabit. In identifying necessities — food, shelter, clothing, and fuel — and detailing specifically the costs of his experiment, he points out that many so-called necessities are, in fact, luxuries that contribute to spiritual stagnation.

He writes of the morning hours as a daily opportunity to reaffirm his life in nature, a time of heightened awareness. The man who has "seeds of a better life in him" may progress to a broader, more poetic understanding of the natural world, and ultimately achieve true spirituality.

He stresses that there may be as many ways of transcending worldly values as there are men. He provides context for his observations by posing the question of why man has "just these species of animals for his neighbors.

In "Higher Laws," Thoreau discusses preoccupation with hunting and fishing as one stage in the evolution toward spiritual consciousness. This parable demonstrates the endurance of truth. Active Themes The nearest Thoreau came to possessing a house was when he intended to buy the Hollowell farm, but then the farmer's wife changed her mind and didn't want to sell.

Active Themes Men often confuse the appearance of things with reality, Thoreau believes, but with true wisdom and unhurriedness it is possible to get past "petty pleasures" and perceive matters of true worth. In this first part, he introduces himself and describes the self-defeating behavior of his townspeople.

Spring Thoreau describes spring coming to Walden Pond with details suggestive of creation. By living deliberately, self-reliantly, and independently in the present, we may transcend the limits of time, "walk with the Builder of the universe.

Thoreau, Emerson, and Transcendentalism

During this period, Thoreau assisted his family in pencil manufacturing, and worked for a time as a town surveyor. In discussing vegetarian diet and moderation in eating, sobriety, and chastity, he advocates both accepting and subordinating the physical appetites, but not disregarding them.

We commonly do not remember that it is, after all, always the first person that is speaking. The Individual — Centrality and Independence As the story of Thoreau's own spiritual journey, Walden elevates the individual in a personal way.

Rhetorical Analysis of “Where I Lived, and What I Lived for” by: Henry David Thoreau you should work for that ideal and pure way of life that has no unnecessary concepts and things in it. Theses rhetorical strategies demonstrate his approach toward life, being that he can only Live with how life treats him, and not treat it to live what.

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Where I Lived, and What I Lived For Quotes

LitCharts: Sign Up: Sign In: Lit Guides For Thoreau, being close to nature is the best part of his choice of place to live. Acquiring the material possession of a. While Thoreau lived at Walden (July 4, –September 6, Thoreau, Emerson, and Transcendentalism; Summary and Analysis; Table of Contents.

All Subjects. What Is Transcendentalism? and closes the chapter with reference to the lack of domestic sounds at his Walden home.

Nature, not the incidental noise of living, fills his senses. ― Henry David Thoreau, Where I Lived, and What I Lived For tags: busy-life, connectedness, disconnected, in-the-moment, life-philosophy, writing 0 likes.

Walden serves as a written account of the two years Henry David Thoreau lived alone in a cabin in Concord, Massachusetts. He built this cabin, grew vegetables, and had transcendental experiences. Walden serves as a written account of the two years Henry David Thoreau lived alone in a cabin in Concord, Massachusetts.

He built this cabin, grew vegetables, and had transcendental experiences.

An analysis of the thoreaus concept of nature in where i lived and what i lived for
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Analysis and Notes on Walden -- Henry Thoreau's Text with Adjacent Thoreauvian Commentary